Kona Special Interview – John Borton – Ask a Cycling Coach 227

John Borton is coming to Kona for the first time, but he has done his research and is ready to race. He plans to use his insights in aerodynamics, nutrition, and course knowledge to be as fast as ever. Tune in to hear exactly how John has prepared for IRONMAN World Championships.

More show notes and discussion in the TrainerRoad Forum.


Topics covered in this episode

  • John by the numbers
  • How John qualified for IronMan Kona
  • Balancing life, work, and triathlon
  • How John got aero
  • John’s nutrition strategy
  • How John’s plans to execute the run
  • Who will win this year?

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For more cycling training knowledge, listen to the Ask a Cycling Coach — the only podcast dedicated to making you a faster cyclist. New episodes are released weekly.


Full Transcription of Podcast

Please note this is an automated transcription and is prone to error. If you have any questions, please reference the timestamps in the podcast or video for further clarification. If you have additional questions, please reach out to us at [email protected]

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Kona Special Interview – Norman Banick – Ask a Cycling Coach 226

Norman Banick is a Kona veteran and a previous Ironman winner. This year he is using his experience with consistent training, nutrition, and equipment to be faster than ever. Tune in to learn from Norman’s experience as he prepares for IRONMAN World Championships.

More show notes and discussion in the TrainerRoad Forum.


Topics covered in this episode

  • What it feels like to win an IronMan
  • Can athletes be successful on a mid-volume plan?
  • How Norman started racing triathlons
  • Norman’s pre-race nutrition plan
  • Positioning and pacing for the swim
  • Norman’s equipment checklist
  • How Norman heat trained for Kona
  • Norman’s takeaways from his previous Ironman World Championship

Subscribe to the Podcast

For more cycling training knowledge, listen to the Ask a Cycling Coach — the only podcast dedicated to making you a faster cyclist. New episodes are released weekly.


Full Transcription of Podcast

Please note this is an automated transcription and is prone to error. If you have any questions, please reference the timestamps in the podcast or video for further clarification. If you have additional questions, please reach out to us at [email protected]

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Kona Special Interview – Scott Byram – Ask a Cycling Coach 225

Scott Byram is coming to Kona for the first time, with a clear plan for his race. From punctures, to marginal gains and where to find the best pizza, he has it all figured out. Now, time to make it happen. Tune in to hear all Scott’s insights as he prepares for IRONMAN World Championships.

More show notes and discussion in the TrainerRoad Forum.


Topics covered in this episode

  • How Scott first got into triathlon
  • Balancing training, work, and sleep
  • Scott’s pre- race day nutrition plan
  • Dealing with mid-race punctures
  • What to expect going into the run
  • How Scott paces his run
  • Scott’s preferred post-race meal

Subscribe to the Podcast

For more cycling training knowledge, listen to the Ask a Cycling Coach — the only podcast dedicated to making you a faster cyclist. New episodes are released weekly.


Full Transcription of Podcast

Please note this is an automated transcription and is prone to error. If you have any questions, please reference the timestamps in the podcast or video for further clarification. If you have additional questions, please reach out to us at [email protected]

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Kona Special Interview – Frida Hedman – Ask a Cycling Coach 224

Frida Hedman is a first time Kona qualifier and exemplifies the discipline that it takes to get there. Frida manages to balance her career, family life and triathlon by using efficient training methods to prepare for Kona all the way from Sweden. Tune in to learn from all of her hard work for IRONMAN World Championships.

More show notes and discussion in the TrainerRoad Forum.


Topics covered in this episode

  • How Frida started racing triathlons
  • Tips to improve on the swim
  • How Frida manages heavy training loads
  • Dealing with equipment changes before race day
  • How Frida heat trained for Kona from Sweden
  • Frida’s race day nutrition plan
  • How Frida paces the run

Subscribe to the Podcast

For more cycling training knowledge, listen to the Ask a Cycling Coach — the only podcast dedicated to making you a faster cyclist. New episodes are released weekly.


Full Transcription of Podcast

Please note this is an automated transcription and is prone to error. If you have any questions, please reference the timestamps in the podcast or video for further clarification. If you have additional questions, please reach out to us at [email protected]

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Is cycling bad for my oral health?

cyclist showing his teeth

After a glorious summer on the pedals and with the temperature dropping ever so slightly I have found myself recently, nursing a dull ache coming from my chops.  Is cycling bad for my oral health? Is my bike to blame?

Sports drinks, gels and bars are bad for your teeth. This finding, from research just published in the British Dental Journal, is hardly surprising.  

Indeed, many cycling enthusiasts – even those that take the time to bake a home-made banana loaf or pilfer their wife’s carefully created energy balls – will likely take more interest in caring for their teeth than the population at large.

Sugary stuff is pretty hard to avoid. But we can sleep easy (once the lid is replaced on the tube), safe in the knowledge that those pre, during or post workout energy boosts have been safely brushed away.

Or not

“Elite athletes have high rates of oral disease despite brushing their teeth more frequently than most people,” the UCL scientists found.

Of the 352 Olympic and professional athletes in 11 sports, including cycling, 94% said they brushed their teeth at least twice a day, and 44% regularly cleaned between their teeth (flossing). This is far higher than the general population: 75% for twice-daily brushing and 21% for flossing.

I don’t know anyone who flosses, so maybe that’s a good place to start. But for those who are already doing that – as well as brushing, going to the dentist every 6 months, not smoking and eating healthily – the findings are a bit of a kick in the teeth.

Dr Julie Gallagher from the UCL Eastman Dental Institute Centre for Oral Health and Performance said it’s the gels, bars and drinks that are the issue.

“The sugar in these products increases the risk of tooth decay and the acidity of them increases the risk of erosion. This could be contributing to the high levels of tooth decay and acid erosion we saw during the dental check-ups.”

Now, these are ‘elite athletes’. As such, they may well be quaffing more sports drinks than your average Joe, or David. However, the fact they are seemingly doing all they can to protect their teeth and gums – and still have poor oral health must be hard to take.

Amongst those athletes, the researchers found:

  • nearly half (49.1%) had untreated tooth decay
  • the large majority showed early signs of gum inflammation
  • almost a third (32%) reported that their oral health had a negative impact on their training and performance.

So now they’re looking at introducing more hygiene habits – like additional fluoride use from mouthwash, more frequent dental visits and reducing their intake of sports drinks – to help the professional cyclists, runners, swimmers et al improve their gnashers. The results aren’t out yet, so what can you do?

Professor Damien Walmsley, scientific advisor at the British Dental Association, had this advice for readers of The Draft:

“Competitive sport requires considerable energy to beat the competition – but quenching your thirst by sipping on energy drinks for long periods amounts to constantly bathing your teeth in sugar.  The sugar-free varieties are just as damaging, as these drinks are also acidic which over time can strip the enamel of your teeth. This erosion makes teeth vulnerable to tooth decay.

 “I’d advise people to steer clear of ‘energy drinks’. Drink plenty of water to stay hydrated, and perhaps consider more complex carbohydrates to sustain energy levels.”

For us mere mortals:

Start with a decent bowl of porridge before that long Saturday ride, providing slow release energy (maybe go crazy and add peanut butter – though be warned, it’s claggy so you’ll want to brush before leaving the house).

Keep hydrated, with water, which will also stop you getting ‘dry mouth’ (saliva helps protect your teeth). Then think about balancing what you need. If you are doing a session after work, think about the fuel you’ll need in advance, so you can go for the complex carbs rather than the last minute gel.

On longer rides, there’s a fair chance you could be over-fuelling, especially at the coffee shop stop. I’m also not sure where the science for the recommended intakes for energy gels comes from. One every 25-45 minutes – really? On whose advice: the marketing team? Can anyone carry that many gels on an 8-hour ride?

And for the commuters: you don’t need an energy gel on the way from Tooting to Westminster – however hard you ride.

Yellow Jersey Cycle Insurance policies can cover you while you are training, travelling and racing and offers up to £500 emergency physio and dental treatment as standard – click here to get your free quote.

The post Is cycling bad for my oral health? appeared first on Yellow Jersey.

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Hot weather cycling. Don’t let heat spoil your ride.

Europe is in the midst of an unprecedented heatwave, just as many of you will be heading there on holiday, or to race.

It’s crucial not to underestimate the effect high temperatures can have on your cycling. The average daily high in Mallorca last July was 34 degrees centigrade, and areas such as Andalucia in the South of Spain saw 39 degrees most days. This is more than enough to wipe out most of us, and there were days when the peak temperatures were even higher.  For the next couple of weeks, temperatures across mainland Europe are set to exceed 40 degrees centigrade.

The current heatwave is likely to push temperatures in the UK up to 25 – 30 degrees. It’s hardly doomsday weather, but more than enough to be dangerous if you are not used to cycling in it.

We look at how higher temperatures can effect your performance, the early warning signs of heat exhaustion, and how to keep yourself safe cycling in hot weather.

Hot weather cycling

Heat and Heart Rate

Sports Physiologist Dr Garry Palmer spoke to us about the impact of temperature on our body’s ability to do work, and how this affects heart rate.

His experiment looked at the effects of cooling while using an indoor trainer, but the results can be applied to a hot climate too, particularly while climbing when you don’t have the cooling effect of speed.

As the temperature rises, your body begins sending more blood towards the surface of your skin to aid cooling. If you are exercising at the same time, your heart needs to work harder to continue supplying your muscles with blood. This all leads to ‘greater cardiac stress’, and if there is one thing we can all agree on, the higher your heart rate goes, the more it hurts.

The solution? A sensible person would tell you to slow down.

Dehydration

As hard as you try to prevent it, higher temperatures are going to dehydrate you more quickly than you can take that water back on. As little as 1% dehydration can impair your performance by as much as 5%, and sodium lost through sweat can be linked to muscle cramping during exercise.

You are going to start sweating the moment you leave your fancy air-conditioned hotel room, and as you continue throughout your ride, it’s going to get more and more difficult to maintain your pace. When riding in hot climates, it’s particularly important to drink enough water and sodium to offset dehydration as much as possible.

One top tip is to take two large bidons; one from the tap, and one out of the freezer. By the time the first bottle is empty, the second will be thawed meaning you have cool water the whole way round your ride.

Sunburn

It’s stating the obvious really, but the only thing more ridiculous than a cyclist’s tan lines is the outline of bibshorts and jersey in your crippling sunburn. Make sure you have a little tube of suncream in your saddlebag or back pocket, and top up as you go.

Heat Exhaustion

We’re getting a little more serious now; heat exhaustion will seriously spoil your day if not your week.

If you aren’t replacing your fluids quickly enough, dehydration can lead to a decrease in blood pressure and blood volume. The symptoms include extreme tiredness, dizziness and nausea. It’s incredibly important to keep toped up with fluids and make a stop if you start to feel the signs of heat exhaustion, because if you leave it to long, you could find yourself facing…

Heatstroke

Your body is no longer able to cool itself, and your body temperature becomes dangerously high. In other words, you should already be on your way to hospital. Make sure everyone in the group you’re riding with recognises the signs of heat exhaustion and heatstroke, and if riding alone, make sure you have someone to call if you get into trouble.

For more information on heat exhaustion and heatstroke, you can check out the NHS website.

Ultimately, as well as keeping topped up with water and sun cream, the best advice is not to go too hard.

I know it’s a bit like your mum telling you to wear a scarf when it’s cold, but you need to adapt your riding to your environment. Some of the newer Garmins are coming with thermometers which will add temperature data to Strava for you. You’ll have bragging rights even if it was a slow burn when your friends notice you completed your climb at 35°C.

The post Hot weather cycling. Don’t let heat spoil your ride. appeared first on Yellow Jersey.

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