Birmingham Bike Advocate Kathryn Doornbos

Kathryn Doornbos is the executive director of Redemptive Cycles, a non-profit organization in Birmingham, Alabama operating since 2013.  Redemptive’s mission is to “redeem the streets” by getting more people on bicycles to make Birmingham a “more connected, comfortable and livable city.” Redemptive works to achieve its goal by selling many refurbished and some new bicycles, providing professional quality repair and maintenance services below market rates (using a sliding scale rate to reduce repair charges based on a customer’s ability to pay) and though its very successful “earn a bike” program, whereby those in need can volunteer at the shop, learn how to repair and maintain bicycles and leave with their very own bike.

Kathryn’s story to becoming the executive director of Redemptive is an interesting one. She grew up in North Carolina, just across the famous Brasstown Bald Mountain in Georgia.  She graduated from Mercer College and then spent a year in Thailand as a Fullbright Fellow. https://www.cies.org. She then started graduate school at the University of Alabama in Birmingham (UAB) seeking a PhD in Microbiology.  And, it was while after a long day in the lab, Kathryn was riding her bicycle she says “in search of a drink” when she rode right into Redemptive’s Thursday Night Trample Ride (for more than 5 years now, rain, shine, sleet or snow, every Thursday night at 6:30 pm, people meet at Redemptive for a casual 8-12 mile ride).  From there, she ended up writing some grant applications for Redemptive – which she knew how to do as a result of doing this for her scientific research work. And, just a few days after Kathryn defended her doctoral dissertation, she became the executive director at Redemptive in April 2017. By the way, she also did obtain her PhD so, it’s really Dr. Kathryn Doornbos.

So, I recently had the pleasure of getting to sit down and speak with her about what’s happening with cycling in Birmingham. First, she told me that she is very excited about the Complete Streets ordinance which the Birmingham City Council passed last spring. [Birmingham Complete Streets ordinance – Kathryn to provide] Complete Streets legislation is designed to treat all road users – people in cars, people riding bicycles, people walking – equally as regards access and safety.  So, on all new roads and – this is really important according to Kathryn – on all roads that are modified or re-paved (including re-striping and re-lining) the legislation will apply. As a practical matter, this will mean that roads will have to provide adequate space for ALL users – not just cars.  The goal will be to lower user density and lower speed, thereby making the road safer for all.

Kathryn gave some examples of what this means and for anyone familiar with Birmingham, this is a biggie. The 4 lane which goes over Red Mountain will be reduced to 2 lanes, with one additional protected lane for pedestrians and bicyclists. Red Mountain connects Birmingham’s southside with Homewood and the other over the mountain communities and anyone traveling this road realizes that, at present, in reality, it’s more of a 3.5 lane road than a 4 lane road.  Reducing the road to 2 lanes will provide these 2 lanes with adequate width and,of course, the protected lane will encourage use of the road for people on bikes, joggers and pedestrian commuters.

Another example Kathryn gave of how Complete Streets will be implemented is in the Avondale area where 41st Street between 5th Avenue South (Avondale Park) and 1st Avenue South (the train tracks) will go from 4 lanes to 2 lanes with ample space left on either side of the road for people riding bicycles and people walking. Plus, the Avondale merchants and restaurants also will gain increased outdoor seating areas.  Undoubtedly, this will result in accelerating the pace of the already vibrant ongoing redevelopment of the Avondale retail and business area.

Redemptive Cycles

In addition to Complete Streets, Kathryn remains very committed and proud of the work Redemptive continues to do. She states that she always has been very passionate about social inequality. And, that while many great organizations have long worked hard to provide access to food, medicine and shelter to the less fortunate among us, the fact of the matter is that “transportation inequality” also is a big problem.  Kathryn points out that providing people with affordable transportation – like a good, functioning bicycle – “literally changes their geography of opportunity.” In other words, having a bicycle and being in a city with infrastructure in place designed to encourage safe cycling greatly expands where people can work, where they can go to get health care, or food or education.  As Kathryn sees it – just because a person is poor does not mean that they shouldn’t have the opportunity to work, or go to school, or have access to health care and every other thing a city offers. But, if you can’t get there because you cannot afford a car or, because the city is unsafe to cycle in, then these opportunities simply are not afforded to you. And, Kathryn, plus all the folks at Redemptive, plus many other stake-holders in the Birmingham are working very hard to change that.

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New Places for Bikes ranks Madison in top 10

Like any of you who filled out a Places for Bikes Community Survey last year, today I got the email below announcing the 2019 rankings:   Dear David, The 2019 PlaceForBikes City Ratings are live! The PlacesForBikes City Ratings are designed to show cities where they stand — and provide insight into what type of investments should […]
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A Black Eye for Wisconsin Bicycling

Once Wisconsin was a national leader in bicycling with the most miles of trails and ranked second best state overall for bicycling by The League of American Bicyclists in their Bicycle Friendly State rating system. In the ten years that the LAB has been ranking bicycle-friendly states, Wisconsin has fallen from 2nd place to an embarrassing #25 in this year’s Bicycle […]
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Biking While Black

In 2010, Richmond, California got lucky when Brooklyn born Najari Smith planted roots in the Bay Area city, quickly claiming a very important role in his new community. Having given more than 1,100 bikes to Richmond’s youth and community members in the last 6 years, Najari’s vision and mission to promote a bike-centric lifestyle has been undeniably successful. He is the founder of Rich City Rides, a Bay Area bike advocacy organization, cooperative worker-owned shop, club, and community hub. And it is Najari’s commitment to combating displacement and eradicating poverty while empowering members of his community using the bicycle as the vehicle to do so that landed him in jail on August 3rd.

Oakland PD arrested Najari during the Black Unity Ride that honored Nia Wilson who was murdered on July 22 on the platform of the MacArthur BART station. Coinciding with First Friday, Oakland’s largest monthly street festival, Najari led a group of cyclists from three organizations (Rich City Rides, Red Bike and Green, and the Scraper Bike team) in a peaceful slow roll paying homage to Ms.Wilson while celebrating the resilience, hope, and strength of a community that’s historically suffered unspeakable injustices just for being…black.

While still on his bicycle, towing a small trailer carrying a speaker used to play music during the community rides he leads (and he’s led over 300 of them on Sunday mornings), Najari was stopped by an Oakland Police Officer and cited for violation of Vehicle Code 27007 (noise amplification). The officer aggressively grabbed Najari’s handlebars and told him to dismount his bike and escort him to the police vehicle. After cooperating with the officer and providing 2 forms of identification, Najari was handcuffed, put in the back of the police vehicle, and taken to the station. His bicycle, trailer, and speaker were impounded (and collected 4 days later in damaged condition) and Najari was transferred to Santa Rita where he was forced to remove his clothes, put on the orange jumpsuit, and detained for 2 nights in a holding cell as if he were a danger to society; as if he were a criminal.

Even if there weren’t several other sources of “amplified noise” at First Friday (loud music coming from several other bikes and cars), Vehicle code 27007 allows exceptions for “political and other special events.”  Does a Black Unity Ride Against Racism to heighten the awareness of the murder of an African American woman less than a month before not qualify as both a political and special event? Oakland PD ignored the political exception, misplaced the law, and escalated the situation by arresting Mr. Smith. But the community ride during which Najari was arrested has been occurring for 10 years, always ending at First Friday. So it’s NOT ironic that Najari was unlawfully targeted and grossly mistreated on this particular occasion. His arrest was a deliberate and egregious misuse of power meant to instill fear in the people the Oakland PD are sworn in to protect.

Mayor of Richmond, Tom Butt, spoke with me this past weekend about Najari’s arrest and his countless contributions to the city he calls home. “Najari is a respected and loved pillar in the community and this would not have happened in Richmond,” the Mayor said. “Our police department does not conduct itself that way. There are things about [Naj’s] arrest that don’t add up and the inconsistencies definitely suggest a racial bias.” Najari confirmed Mayor Butt’s sentiments telling me, “My experiences with the Richmond PD are very different [than they are in Oakland]… Officers roll down their windows to say hi and wave when we ride by. They are friendly and I haven’t had a problem with them before. Sometimes they ask that we move closer to the right side of the street, but that’s a request made with the safety of the riders in mind.”

The District Attorney’s office has been quoted saying they plan to drop the criminal charges against Mr.Smith (Section 148, Resisting Arrest and Obstructing a Peace Officer), however Najari is preparing for his mandatory court appearance tomorrow, Friday August 31, in hopes that the Oakland PD will also dismiss the Noise Amplification citation, clearing his record of any blemish.

As deeply offensive and infuriating as Najari’s arrest has been, is the Bay Area community really shocked or surprised? A more than 2 decade long chronicle of illegal, racially biased, terrorizing behavior directed towards the black community on the part of the Oakland Police Department speaks volumes for the challenges and hurdles Najari faces. Yet his path is one of peace and his use of the bicycle to make significant civic contributions is deserving of national recognition and gratitude. His commitment to saving the most vulnerable members of his community and the places around him through acts of service and mentorship are a testament to his unwavering humanity. Najari Smith is a custodian of hope.

When I spoke to him last night, Najari shared a few reasons why a life on two wheels is so meaningful to him. I could hear a smile in his voice when he told me, “I’ve been doing it since I was a little kid. Biking is a mode of transportation and bikes have been healing for me. The things I love about cycling are …. bringing people together from different neighborhoods, working with kids; giving them something to do. ‘Cause if we don’t give them something to do they’ll find something on their own. Bikes have been the vehicle to build 3 different parks in Richmond, and soon every part of Richmond will have a [bike] park; a safe place for people to gather and do something healthy and fun… and we’re doing it together as a community.”

The indignities and injustices suffered by Najari are indicative of a crisis that’s not contained within the Oakland city limits. The violations of his civil rights are racial, socioeconomic, and they are endemic to the non-white communities in our country. Biking while black should be no different than biking while pink, purple, brown, or white. The pursuit of happiness should require no specific shape, size, color, or creed. Our humanity is being threatened and unless we proactively and consistently denounce attacks like the ones suffered by Najari Smith at the hands of the Oakland Police Department, we are contributing to a culture that promotes ignorance, cowardice, and hate. Bike Law and I believe in inclusivity and LOVE.

Below is a link to two petitions I urge you all to sign. The first encourages the DA and Oakland PD to drop all charges against Najari Smith. The second is to assist Najari and Rich City Rides as they respond to the need for preserving public access and non-privatized use of the Point Molate shoreline. The proposal is for the creation of the Major Taylor Bike Park and Velodrome. This public park would link to the Bay Trail, stewarded by the East Regional Park District, featuring a velodrome for regional and competitive cycling and training. This is my call to action. Here is a way you can affect change. https://www.richcityrides.org/petitions-update

Together, we ride safe, happy, often, and proud.

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